back to homepagee-mail us!search!play the game!<share your story!the Living Africa
go to: the peoplego to: the landgo to: wildlifego to: national parks


bovid family
bovid family
other herbivores
carnivores
primates

wildlife (back to intro)

in this section
Blue Duiker
Dik-Dik
Gazelle tribe
Thomson's gazelle
Grant's gazelle
Gerenuk
Kob antelope
Waterbuck
Sable antelope
Oryx or Gemsbok
Hartebeest
Topi or Tsessebe
Common Wildebeest
Impala
Bushbuck
Sitatunga
Greater Kudu
Bongo
Common eland
African or Cape buffalo
Giraffe
Greater Kudu: Tragelaphus strepsciceros

Known for its spectacular, long horns. The greater kudu is the second-tallest antelope in Africa.

Characteristics

Weight and Height
males: wt 418-693 lb (190-315 kg), ht 48-60 in (122-150 cm)
females: wt 264-473 lb (120-215 kg), ht 40-56 in (100-140 cm)

Horns
2.5 turns (ocassionally 3); generally 48 in (120 cm) long, however the longest ever recorded was 72 in (180 cm).

Coat
Smooth; beard in males only.

Color
Red-brown to blue-gray; 6 to 10 stripes on torso; white nose chevron and small cheeck spots; dark garters on leg; black-tipped tail and white underside.


Page not found | SchoolNet South Africa

This is somewhat embarrassing, isn’t it?

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching, or one of the links below, can help.

Most Used Categories

Archives

Try looking in the monthly archives.


General Locations
Much of eastern and southern Africa: in the region extending from Chad to the Red Sea, then south to Cape Province, then west to Namibia and then north to mid-Angola. The greater kudu is one of the only animals that thrives on scrub woodland and bush that grows in abandoned fields and pastures.

Greater kudus can be seen in the following national parks and reserves: Selous and Ugalla GR, Ruaha NP, Tanzania; Luambe and Luangwa NP, Zambia; Hwange NP and other Zimbabwe parks; Kruger NP and Natal reserves, South Africa; Etosha NP, Namibia.

Habitat
Greater kudus rely on concealment, so it is often hard for them to find home ranges which fit their needs. Some of the preferred habitats are mopane bush, mixed scrub woodland, and acacia on lowlands, mountains and hills. The greater kudu will eat almost any kind of leaf, herb, fruit, vine, tuber, and flower.


Activity
Greater kudus are both nocturnal and diurnal. Females have been known to spend 50 to 58% of a 24-hour day hunting for food, and 45% of the night doing the same. In some areas, kudus have been seen hiding during the day and only coming out at night. However, researchers believe that this is due to large numbers of humans hunting or passing through the area.

Social System
Herds typically include 1 to 3 females and their offspring. In Kruger NP, for example, herds were generally observed to have 5 to 6(up to 15) members which stayed together for life. Occasionaly, two herds will merge forming groups of 20 to 30 kudus. Kudus have been known to have rather large home ranges: one range recorded was 889 acres (360 ha) and another was 1284 acres (520 ha).

Accompanying the female herds are bachelor herds which contain anywhere from 2 to 10 males. Males tend to have larger home ranges. One range was recorded to be 2717 acres (1100 ha).


Page not found | SchoolNet South Africa

This is somewhat embarrassing, isn’t it?

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching, or one of the links below, can help.

Most Used Categories

Archives

Try looking in the monthly archives.


Reproduction
The typical gestation period is 9 months. In southern Africa, calving takes place between February and March while the grass is still high. Females may conceive at the age of 2 and males mature by age 5.

Predators
Lion, spotted hyena, other large carnivores.



©  Copyright 1998, ThinkQuest team 16645
All rights reserved.

http://library.advanced.org/PILAfrica/en/webs/16645/wildlife/greater_kudu.shtml